Ada Lovelace Day 2014 – A celebration of Women in STEM at the Royal Institution of Great Britain, London

by caro on August 13, 2014 · 0 comments

Well, you may have heard of Delia Derbyshire Day, and there is also an Ada Lovelace Day which takes place at the Royal Institution of Great Britain in London on TUES OCT 14th 2014.

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Who is Ada Lovelace (1815-1852)? Only the woman who is said to have written the first computer programme and was instrumental in the development of the Analytical Engine (a mechanical computer) credited to Charles Babbage.

The event is described as a cabaret of science hosted by presenter, comedian & geek songsmith Helen Arney (from the amazing Festival of the Spoken Nerd and to whom I will be eternally grateful for granting me the opportunity to break a glass with my voice). Ada Lovelace Day is an international celebration of the achievements of women in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths).

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And amongst the clever lasses taking part, they have invited little me to present a little about the late great Delia Derbyshire, her pioneering electronic music making techniques and perform part of my DD Day commission ‘Audient, my dear’ which is a creative response to the Delia Derbyshire archive here in Manchester, UK as well as fellow DD Day 2013 founder and artist Naomi Kashiwagi.

FIND OUT MORE ABOUT ADA LOVELACE DAY 2014 AND BUY TICKETS BY CLICKING HERE

History highlight:

According the Royal Institution, many of the ground-breaking scientific discoveries made here over the past two centuries have been achieved by women. For instance, did you know it was Kathleen Lonsdale who determined the structure of Benzene in 1925, Dorothy Hodgkin who advanced the technique of X-ray crystallography and won the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1964, and Louise Johnson who helped determine the structure of the enzyme lysozyme in the 1960s? Me neither..

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